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FBI executes large-scale computer crimes crackdown

Personal computers are ubiquitous, and many people do not feel they can start their days without logging on and checking their email and social media accounts. While for some Sacramento residents, computers are a way to connect with others via web-based portals, for others, computers are a daily necessity for completing their jobs and maintaining their livelihoods. Federal regulations exist that limit certain online behaviors, and legislation dictates specific internet crimes. Nonetheless, in many respects, the law is chasing the growth of the digital world and, in some cases, is falling behind.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), in conjunction with other international law enforcement organizations, recently completed a wide-scale computer crimes operation that resulted in over 90 arrests across the globe. Particularly, the crackdown targeted users of the alleged hacker program Blackshades. Blackshades is purported to be used to remotely access personal computers to gain access to web cameras, passwords and other computer-based data.

It is reported that the operation was executed contemporaneously between the various countries, giving the targets of the attack little warning that they were about to face possible arrest. As the FBI wraps up its execution of the operation, it will now have to ensure that it has a solid case against each and every one of the alleged criminals it netted in its search.

Individuals who are suspected of computer and internet crimes have the same rights as individuals charged with other crimes. They may choose to work with attorneys, and they should be considered innocent until proven otherwise. Differences do exist between computer crimes and traditional criminal charges, particularly with regard to the damages the alleged criminals inflict on their supposed victims. A lot of people know how to use computers, but not everyone knows the intricacies of the laws pertinent to their acceptable use. For these reasons, those who do choose to work with attorneys to defend them on their charges may benefit from selecting lawyers with internet and computer crime experience .

Source: CNN Money, "Inside FBI's massive cybercrime bust," Evan Perez & Shimon Prokupecz, May 19, 2014

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